Monthly Archives: August 2014

Ceramic Sheep

Ceramic Sheep

Riverside Mill - home of the Devon Guild of Craftsmen

Riverside Mill – home of the Devon Guild of Craftsmen

We popped into the fabulous home of the Devon Guild of Craftsmen, Riverside Mill, in Bovey Tracey and were lucky enough to catch the members summer exhibition, Materials Matter. The exhibition’s theme centres on celebrating the diversity of contemporary craft materials used by the Guild Members.

I’ve included a few of my favourite pieces from the exhibition  – including the pieces I voted for in the People’s Choice Award, (can you guess which one it is?)

Isabella Whitworth scarves

Isabella Whitworth scarves

Yuli Somme, Crufts Tea Cosy

Yuli Somme, Crufts Tea Cosy

 

Isabella Whitworth’s beautiful shibori scarves made with natural dyes including her own grown indigo. Photo doesn’t do justice to her colours.

 

 

 

I loved  Yuli Somme’s felted Crufts Tea Cosy. 

 

 

Detail of Liz Clay's peice

Detail of Liz Clay’s piece

 

Liz Clay’s felted and pleated work showed a very Japanese influence in its use of dyeing and pleating techniques.

 

 

Peter Lane’s porcelain bowls had such stunning iridescent colours combined with an incredible delicate sense of lightness to them.

Riverside Mill Terrace cafe, check out the sedum roof!

Riverside Mill Terrace cafe, check out the sedum roof!

To top off our visit we had a delicious brunch of salmon & scrambled eggs on homemade wholemeal toast and a pot of Earl grey tea in the  cafe on the roof top terrace.

Devon Guild of Craftsmen at Riverside Mill is a great venue with a programme of fantastic exhibition and events throughout the year – a must visit if you’re in the area. You can check it out at www.crafts.org.uk  Material Matters runs until 7th September 2014.

 

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The Wet Felting Company

Whilst we were in Devon this weekend, we went to Yelverton, walked Drake’s Trail – a great new walking/cycling addition to the Plym Valley Trail linking Tavistock, Yelverton and Plymton along the old railway line AND discovered The Wet Felting Company.

I had the pleasure of meeting Clare Packer, the feltmaker / owner of The Wet Felting Company shop in the appropriately named Leg O’Mutton, Yelverton. Clare makes felted slippers and runs workshops for groups and schools, check out the fantastic work created at her workshops on her blog. (www.thewetfeltcompany.blogspot.co.uk)

 

Clare Packer's great logo for The Wet Felting Company, Leg O'Mutton, Yelverton, Devon.

Clare Packer’s great logo for The Wet Felting Company, Leg O’Mutton, Yelverton, Devon.

 

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Draw to Remember

Field of Poppies, Helen Manley

Field of Poppies, Helen Manley

Congratulations Rosemary Radford and Helen Manley on your work showing in the Draw to Remember exhibition at The Botanical Gardens, Birmingham. Rosemary created her 100 Poppies in One during a 12 week textiles class and Helen on the Landscapes in Wool weekend workshop I ran at the Midlands Art Centre this summer.

You can catch the exhibition Draw to Remember from 3 – 31 August at The Botanical Gardens.

100 poppies in one, Rosemary Radford

100 poppies in one, Rosemary Radford

 

 

 

 

 

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Altar Cloth Commission

Everyday Altar Cloth, St. Matins in the Bull Ring

Everyday Altar Cloth, St. Matins in the Bull Ring

I recently completed a commission of two altar cloths for the historic church of St. Martin’s in the Bull Ring, Birmingham, one for the High Altar and the second for the smaller everyday altar. The commission was looking for pieces that reflected St. Martin’s congregation and the community it serves.

St. Martins history, mirrors the development of Birmingham as a settlement and evolution as an ethnically & culturally diverse community. St. Martins serves a wide and diverse community of both established residents, new & transient people, new to the city and country.

Each altar cloth is an abstract textured design in felted merino wool incorporating a graduated range of rich shades of a single colour in suitable ecclesiastical colours. Shimmering threads, sparkling yarns and fabrics run through the felted wool to echo the St. Martins community.

Detail of Altar cloths

Detail of Altar cloths

The threads, yarns & fabric interwoven in the wool represent the drawing together and bonding of the diverse community & congregation of the church community. The shaft of lighter fibres at the centre of the altar cloths along side the shimmering fibres and fabrics, represents the light of God, the faithful and hope, lighting a path to faith and healing.

The use of felting as a process to create the cloths holds significance, as the process takes physical effort to bond, enmesh and pull the tangling fibres into one united fabric, reflecting the drawing together and bonding of the St. Martins community.

High Altar Cloth, St. Martins in the Bull Ring

High Altar Cloth, St. Martins in the Bull Ring

 

 

 

 

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